Gourmet France: Famous French Sweets That Will Make Your Mouth Water

France isn’t famous just for its French cheese regions; gourmet France is also well-known all over the world for its sumptuous sweet offerings. No visit to France will ever be complete without gorging on one or all of these desserts. Whether you’re making a trip to Paris or the nearest patisserie in your city, here’s a list of French sweets that you definitely need to try.

French Macarons

French Macarons

So, what makes this French cookie oh-so special? Well, for one, they’re made from almond flour and come in a wide array of flavors and colors. Macarons are not just a feast for the eyes; they’re a feast for the mouth as well.

French Crepes

Crepes can be found in just about any cafe in Paris so failing to eat your fill of this sweet treat when you’re in the city is practically committing a grave sin. These very thin pancakes are made from flour, milk, eggs, and butter and served with your choice of sweet topping. Lemon and sugar, anyone?

French Glace

Glace

Glace to France is basically what gelato is to Italy. It’s a creamier, much richer ice cream that you can get in all sorts of flavors. If you want to get a taste of the real thing, head to the south of France as it’s quite rare to find a good glace anywhere else.

Chocolates

Chocolate

Good news for all chocoholics out there! The French have elevated chocolate into an art form, making France once of the best places to spoil yourself with choices. Here are just some of the best premium brands that you need to sample while in France: Valrhona, La Maison du Chocolat, La Chocolaterie de Puyricard, and Richart.

Calissons

Calissons from Aix in Provence

This traditional candy made from candied fruit paste is the toast of Aix en Provence. Having a similar texture to the marzipan, calissons are topped with ground almonds over a layer of royal icing.

Nouget

Nougat from Southern Provence

Provence in the south of France has the best nougat in the world so if you’re craving for a chewy bar with honey, pistachios, and almonds, you know where to go.

Creme Brule

Creme Brulee

What’s soft and creamy with a caramelized sugar crust? It’s the creme brulee, of course! There’s nothing more satisfying than sinking your teeth into the crust, digging your spoon into the velvety custard filling, and taking a sweet bite of heaven.

Madeleines

Originally made in the Lorraine region in northeastern France, these shell-shaped mini cakes are so soft that they quickly dissolve when you put them in your mouth. Light spongy madeleines are best served with your favorite tea or coffee, making them the perfect treat for a lazy weekend.

Tarte Tatin

Tarte Tatin is the French’s answer to the Americans’ apple pie. It’s an upside-down pastry filled with apple chunks caramelized in sugar and butter. If you ever find yourself craving for a taste of the south while visiting France, the tarte tatin doesn’t disappoint.

Mille-feuille

Also known as the “Napoleon,” the mille-feuille is a classic French pastry that has flaky airy layers with heavy cream and jam in between. Literally translated as “a thousand leaves,” the mille-feuille is well-loved for its simple flavors but amazing textures.

We offer many types of cruises in France where you can visit villages, towns and cities offering the great French Sweets listed above.  Check out our French River Cruise pages for cruises from 5 day – 8 day and our Barge page for the small barge vessels.

Give us a call to find out of latest specials and ask about our payment plan.

888-869-7907  /  713-240-6753  /  jan@europeanbarging.com    River Cruise  and Barge Cruise Specialist since 1998

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Gourmet France: Famous Cheeses from the Best French Cheese Regions

Aside from French sweets, Gourmet France is known for its cheeses. So crazy are the French about their cheeses that there are around 400 distinct types of French cheeses grouped into 8 categories. Since it would take forever to go through every single type of cheese, here are the 10 tastiest cheeses from different French cheese regions that every aspiring French cheese connoisseur needs to know.

 

Cheese tasting

Cheese tasting on the Apres Tout barge in Burgundy France

Brie
Considered as one of the best-known cheeses in the world, brie is a type of soft cheese that becomes softer as it ages. Named after the historic region in Northern France where it’s mainly produced, brie has a rich milk and buttery flavor that makes it perfect to eat with bread and paired with either red or white wine.

Camembert
Named after its birthplace in Camembert, Normandy, Camembert is another type of soft creamy cheese that the French absolutely love. Made with raw cow’s milk, Camembert has an earthy flavor that is similar to brie, only a bit stronger.

Reblochon
This creamy cheese is made in the Haute Savoie Alps region and is one of the more popular grand mountain cheeses readily available in markets today. Made from raw cow’s milk, Reblochon has a strong aroma with a nutty aftertaste.

Edel de Cleron
Made in the village of Cleron in the Franche-Comte region, Edel de Cleron is a traditional cheese made from pasteurized cow’s milk. This soft cheese, known for its woody aftertaste, is best eaten ripe when it’s runny and gooey on the inside.

Delice
The Delice is a type of cheese that is made in Burgundy. Since cream is added in twice with the milk during the cheese-making process, this cheese is rich and exceptionally creamy that you’ll feel it melting in your mouth.

Morbier
Produced in the Eastern region of France, the Morbier is a type of semi-soft cheese that can be made from either raw or pasteurized cow’s milk. The Morbier has a tangy flavor with a hint of citrus and is also fairly elastic.

Pont-L’Eveque
Known as one of the oldest cheeses from Normandy, the Pont-L’Eveque is the only semi-soft cheese with a cross-hatched pale orange rind. Made from raw cow’s milk, it has a creamy smooth texture and a fairly strong pungent aroma.

Mimolette
Traditionally produced in the city of Lille, the Mimolette is a type of hard cheese with a bright orange color and comes in the shape of a cantaloupe. When properly aged, this cheese has a nutty flavor and makes a great addition to any cheese platter.

Comte
Also known as the Gruyere de Comte, the Comte is a delightful hard French cheese with a smoky yet fruity taste. Made from unpasteurized cow’s milk and produced in Eastern France, this versatile cheese is usually melted to make fondue, eaten as a sandwich, or grated over savory dishes.

Roquefort
Known as one of the most popular blue cheeses around, the Roquefort is made from sheep’s milk in the south of France. Similar to the Bleu d’Auvergne, the Roquefort is a rich, creamy, sharp cheese with a pungent aroma.

Taking a barge cruise through the canals of France will give you a chance to taste many different cheeses. The cheeses will be accompanied by complementary wines of the regions as well as great food. Barge cruises range in price from low $3,000’s to over $7.000 per person for 6 nights. Rate includes the cruise, all meals, most non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages and excursions. All barges include bicycles for cycling the towpaths along the canals and exploring the nearby towns and villages. Check out our site to learn about the different barges we offer. For more information contact: jan@europeanbarging.com or 888-869-7907  Barge and River cruise specialist since 1998.